Any colour you like

I’m going to break radio silence a little bit, and drop a post here for the first time in years.

I’ll say up front that if these screenshots offend you, I won’t apologize.

2014-04-06-l3-b7175-luna-simple 2014-04-06-l3-b7175-luna-complex

Nor will I apologize if you find these somehow irritating.

2014-03-26-lv-r1fz6-r 2014-03-18-lv-r1fz6-pure-ftpd

In fact, if you don’t like them, I really don’t care at all. Simply because what I use on my computer is not your business.

Horrified at the thought that someone might still use an interface that was designed before you were born? Deal with it. Can’t believe someone wouldn’t find the Luna-esque Windows XP themes oily and kitsch? Tough. Think I’m a troll if I claim Windows 2000 was the last good Microsoft operating system? Suffer.

The thing is, I still use desktops like that from time to time, maybe just to irritate readers like you, but maybe because it’s what I like.

I got a lot of traffic over the weekend to an old page I drew up a few years ago, about massaging IceWM to follow the look of the old Windows XP Classic theme. The referring site linked to my page, and to another that wasn’t mine, that offered some themes intended to XP-Luna-ify Lubuntu. That’s what you see in the top photos.

I knew it would happen. Unless I’m mistaken, Tuesday was the death knell for Windows XP. Some well-meaning Linux enthusiasts are pushing the OS of their choice, with an XP makeover, as an alternative to buying the newest slop out of Redmond.

And surprisingly (to me, anyway), the majority of the feedback on that referring site was negative. Don’t lull a Windows user into using Linux. You’re doing them a disservice. Tell them to adapt or perish, now as ever, as is nature’s inexorable imperative.

Take a step back for a second. Try to think like you’re not the geek that we both are. ;)

There are a lot of people — a lot — for whom a computer is not a hobby, not a passion, and not the locus of their waking hours. For them, computers are just tools, probably in the same way cars are for other people. Or microwave ovens for others, or bookkeeping for others … or you name it for whoever.

A computer to them is just an object. It’s a thing. It doesn’t hold any great curiosity, it’s not interesting to pull apart, and it doesn’t enthuse them beyond what they need to get a job done. A car gets you from point A to point B, and a computer gets you from point C to point D.

I can sympathize. I have a lot of dis-interests like that. You could talk to me all day about laptops and free software, and you’d lose me the second you changed the subject to real estate or the stock market. It just doesn’t grab me.

So for those folks who need something that behaves how they expect, and does what they need, and looks the way they know … I fail to see the harm in setting up a desktop that is arranged the way they want it.

And if that doesn’t squelch your quasi-insurgent anti-establishment justifications for Ludovico techniques, consider the possibility that Lubuntu rearranged to look like the original Windows XP startup screen might just be what they like.

About five years ago I put fingers to keys and pounded out a list of four hideous reasons to adopt Linux, the last of which was “duress.” Actually, looking over it now is a good reminder of how things were, and what they’ve become.

I won’t retract that last item though. I still think being “forced” to use Linux, either through deceit or the expiration of a 13-year-old operating system, is a bad idea.

But I can’t see the harm in giving someone a newer, or even a different operating system at their request, and then rearranging it to resemble what they know and expect. Or just plain like.

And now, one more, to see if I can trigger a gag reflex in that last tiny segment of the audience who actually read this far:

2014-04-06-g60-125nr-mate-xp-classic

Linux Mint Petra, MATE edition, done over to look like XP. Why? Because I like it that way. :twisted:

The end of the end

I suppose the secret is out; a desktop image was leaked a week or two ago into the Unix screenshot area of reddit.

That can mean only one thing: Yes, I’ve been answering e-mails and concocting some low-end systems again, for better or for worse.

So yes, I suppose I am … you could say, if you want, maybe, it’s possible, kinda-sorta … back in the game. :shock:

But there’s been a definite sea change. After a year and a half of inactivity, I can’t just suddenly pick up and run.

The best way to handle a transition of this magnitude is to acknowledge the closure, and start again fresh.

So without any further ado, here’s a new page for you to visit: inconsolation.wordpress.com.

That’s meant to be a double- or triple-entendre there. I want the focus to be on software for text-based systems, the kind of software that was a joy to write about here, again and again, for so many years.

Therefore, in the console. (Cheesy, I know, but with the layered meaning that I know geeks will appreciate. :) )

Fewer personal rants, fewer esoteric system settings, and more applications that are useful for embedded, text-only, or very low-end hardware. More of the goodies.

And good grief, I know I still have enough software to skim through. :shock: My hands were full when I shut down this site, and are still full now.

Either way, this is the end of the end — things are starting up again, albeit in a new location. If you can take the time, please stop by and see what new toy I discovered. And tell me about your favourite. I do love a good text-based gizmo. … ;)

The elephant in the room: A coda

Before I even get started, before I deliver the unhappy news, I should say first and foremost “thank you,” to everyone who left notes or sent e-mails over the past four months.

There were a lot more than I anticipated, and I apologize if I didn’t get the time to reply to all of them. Regardless, you were all too kind. I am humbled.

It has been four months though, and I have to acknowledge the ugly truth now — I’m very, very unlikely to be able to pick up the schedule I had even six months ago.

Priorities change, life rearranges, and there’s nothing anyone can do except shrug and soldier on.

If it’s any consolation, my “life changes” were good ones — no one went to jail, no one is missing or suddenly responsible for newly arrived little humans. ;)

This was simply a reshuffling of job-related tasks, a few new projects that came to the forefront, and as a result less time for the projects I held dear.

I had hoped that I would be able to adjudicate my resources and keep something fresh on the menu here. But I looked around the other day and realized my collection was actually dusty, which I would never have tolerated a year ago.

And with that realization, I gave it ten minutes’ thought, and decided to cull the herd one last time.

And so it’s all gone.

Everything down to the last spare hard drive, quirky PCMCIA wireless card or giveaway floppy disk. All. Gone.

Gone to the local secondhand shop, gone to friends who could use a second computer, gone to the aluminum recyclers, as a last resort.

I’m left with the X60s, a few USB flash drives, and an odd cable or two.

I kept some rarities — all the CF cards and adapters are still mine, as well as a scarce-as-hen’s-teeth 64Mb stick of PC66. I’m not dumb.

But I look around now, and you’d never guess this was a bastion of Linux zealotry. From here, the battle was fought?

The experience has left its mark though, and the mark is indelible. I flip-flop these days between an Arch Linux installation cut to look like Windows XP (it’s a personal joke, really) and Linux Mint Debian. One or the other can usually get the job done.

Windows will never be back. The real stain of experimenting with Linux for nigh-on-six years is that you realize how things ought to be, and realize you just can’t get everything you want — or need — from Bill & Co.

And even in parts of my life that ordinarily are unrelated to computers, I find the same mindset slipping in.

My latest project — which I won’t link to, out of embarrassment ;) — is licensed under the GFDL, because I want that same spirit of sharing to be repeated there.

And really, that’s what I take away from six years at the keyboard: That the same principles most of us were taught as children — to share, and not to exclude others — are still the best ones we have today.

The world would be a much better place if we all followed the same rules we were taught decades ago, in the sandbox.

If you want to know numbers, I can tell you that, by far and large, the most popular post in this site’s six-year history was the rtorrent tutorial. A close second was the list of things you can do with an old computer.

The busiest day was February 9, 2011, when more than 56,000 people wandered past that same page, to see what the big deal was.

And believe it or not, after four months with zero activity, I still get upward of 1,500 visitors a day — sometimes peaking at 2,000. Who’d’ve thunk it.

I’m not one for long and tearful goodbyes, and I’ve really blabbered on long enough. So let’s call it a wrap.

Thanks for everyone who left comments or offered help in my adventures. Your insight and contributions were instrumental every step of the way.

Thanks in particular to the staff of the Ubuntu Forums and the Ubuntu community in a larger sense. Say what you like about Ubuntu (I did, all too often), but it’s the collective helpfulness and camaraderie of the people who use it that got me out of the starting gate, and where I am now.

And finally, thanks for reading this far.

さようなら, tsamaya ka khotso, and cheers. Be kind to one another. We’re all we’ve got. :)

Hiatus

As I have mentioned in the past, my real-life responsibilities include some middle-management tasks. Quite glamorous.

Unfortunately, as they did last month, those responsibilities became more time-consuming last week, and don’t seem to offer any foreseeable break in the future.

I must put this site into hibernation for a while, and if I can recover the free time it takes to maintain it, I’ll reopen it again.

I apologize if that is disappointing or an inconvenience for you; it is also a little disappointing to me. But unfortunately there are only so many hours in a day, and right now they’re just not enough.

I will probably disable commenting after a few days, but please keep in touch via the e-mail form on the About page. I may get a chance to answer you, but I can’t promise anything.

Keep your fingers crossed. Cheers, and be kind to one another. ;)

Hey, Ridley, ya got any bmon?

Time for another quick look at the wonderful world of console applications.

This is bmon, and it would be easy to dismiss this as yet another network monitor for the console. But actually, I like it a lot.

Most monitors require you to declare an interface at startup, and most of those are tied to that interface until you close the application down, or start a new instance.

bmon is nifty in that it gives you a look at just about everything that’s running, on every interface available. And includes mega-cool svelte animated graphs showing traffic, as it happens.

This would be very useful indeed to anyone using more than one network port on a machine, or perhaps a machine dedicated to relaying network traffic.

For me it’s a little overkill. But the nice thing about console programs is, even when they’re overkill, they’re hardly a drag on your system. Enjoy. :)

P.S.: Thanks to nico for pointing it out. ;)

My Green Fedora

It’s a tiny bit ironic that a day after I harass high-end distros for possibly lowering the bar too much, I show a screenshot of Fedora 15.

I can’t explain why, but I was actually a little bit excited by the prospect of looking at this.

I’m not a Fedora user at all. I grew up (so to speak) in the Ubuntu camp, and while I’ve never really embraced the Red Hat sphere, it certainly never lost points for me.

What can I tell you that you can’t see in the picture, or by booting up the live ISO? It’s blue. It’s clean. The fonts are SO SHARP THEY CUT MY EYES! :shock:

I haven’t run into many problems yet, aside from some glitches with keyboard layout settings that were easily overcome after a moment at the command line.

Not bad though. I might install it for a while on the guinea pig, and give it an equal shake to what Ubuntu got.

The big question is, is this desktop much different than Unity? Not in my estimation. Lots of shiny buttons and flipping composite windows. Glossy and glittery, as is the trend.

I don’t dislike it, at least not any more than Ubuntu’s desktop. But if I have more to say, I’ll be sure to post it in the vein of this. ;)

A self-explanatory conversation

I suppose I should be embarrassed that I actually took up this position in a conversation.

27.05.11 06:50 I’m starting to think that young kids on the Internet are all idiots.
27.05.11 06:58 I have suspected for a long time that everyone on the Internet is an idiot.
27.05.11 06:58 The Internet is like cars and TVs.
27.05.11 06:59 Only idiots on it?
27.05.11 06:59 They have to be reduced to the most inane terms to make them usable by everyone — especially the absolute moron — so that companies can make money.
27.05.11 06:59 So cars are just boxes with wheels, that we turn and go places.
27.05.11 06:59 TVs are just boxes with buttons that show pictures.
27.05.11 06:59 Internet is similar.
27.05.11 07:00 The less complicated, the more people use it, the better a chance to make money.
27.05.11 07:00 And at the same time, the collective census of people using it has an average intelligence level that is slowly floating downward.
27.05.11 07:01 Software is doing the same thing.
27.05.11 07:01 You really should write a book.
27.05.11 07:03 Or start a blog.

There’s really no way to defend that without coming across like an elitist prig. Social grace demands that I withhold some ugly concepts in order to be polite.

I could tell you that all of humanity rolls across a bell curve for computer aptitude, and people near the left-hand tail should probably stick with pens and paper.

But that would imply that some people simply don’t have a practical ability level, and that would sound mean-spirited, and therefore taboo.

I could insist that pushing Linux to embrace more of the central arc of that bell curve means that another resulting curve — the average ability level of Linux users — likewise shifts downward.

But that would imply that pulling in day-to-day users results in less impressive statistics, or that the regular user is getting stupider.

That would likewise be ugly and therefore can’t be repeated.

So I will mention none of those things, and refrain from suggesting that crafting Linux to appeal to less adept computer users is resulting in a mass stupidification of the user base.

I admit I had suggested some similar points, but it was an extract from a conversation on many different topics at once. And I feel slightly guilty now, just as a sign of penitence.

After that, if you inferred anything else, you’re on your own. :evil:


Welcome!



Visit the Wiki!

Some recent desktops


May 6, 2011
Musca 0.9.24 on Crux Linux
150Mhz Pentium 96Mb 8Gb CF
 


May 14, 2011
IceWM 1.2.37 and Arch Linux
L2300 core duo 3Gb 320Gb

Some recent games


Apr. 21, 2011
Oolite on Xubuntu 11.04
L2300 core duo 3Gb 320Gb

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