Hiatus

As I have mentioned in the past, my real-life responsibilities include some middle-management tasks. Quite glamorous.

Unfortunately, as they did last month, those responsibilities became more time-consuming last week, and don’t seem to offer any foreseeable break in the future.

I must put this site into hibernation for a while, and if I can recover the free time it takes to maintain it, I’ll reopen it again.

I apologize if that is disappointing or an inconvenience for you; it is also a little disappointing to me. But unfortunately there are only so many hours in a day, and right now they’re just not enough.

I will probably disable commenting after a few days, but please keep in touch via the e-mail form on the About page. I may get a chance to answer you, but I can’t promise anything.

Keep your fingers crossed. Cheers, and be kind to one another. ;)

Hey, Ridley, ya got any bmon?

Time for another quick look at the wonderful world of console applications.

This is bmon, and it would be easy to dismiss this as yet another network monitor for the console. But actually, I like it a lot.

Most monitors require you to declare an interface at startup, and most of those are tied to that interface until you close the application down, or start a new instance.

bmon is nifty in that it gives you a look at just about everything that’s running, on every interface available. And includes mega-cool svelte animated graphs showing traffic, as it happens.

This would be very useful indeed to anyone using more than one network port on a machine, or perhaps a machine dedicated to relaying network traffic.

For me it’s a little overkill. But the nice thing about console programs is, even when they’re overkill, they’re hardly a drag on your system. Enjoy. :)

P.S.: Thanks to nico for pointing it out. ;)

My Green Fedora

It’s a tiny bit ironic that a day after I harass high-end distros for possibly lowering the bar too much, I show a screenshot of Fedora 15.

I can’t explain why, but I was actually a little bit excited by the prospect of looking at this.

I’m not a Fedora user at all. I grew up (so to speak) in the Ubuntu camp, and while I’ve never really embraced the Red Hat sphere, it certainly never lost points for me.

What can I tell you that you can’t see in the picture, or by booting up the live ISO? It’s blue. It’s clean. The fonts are SO SHARP THEY CUT MY EYES! :shock:

I haven’t run into many problems yet, aside from some glitches with keyboard layout settings that were easily overcome after a moment at the command line.

Not bad though. I might install it for a while on the guinea pig, and give it an equal shake to what Ubuntu got.

The big question is, is this desktop much different than Unity? Not in my estimation. Lots of shiny buttons and flipping composite windows. Glossy and glittery, as is the trend.

I don’t dislike it, at least not any more than Ubuntu’s desktop. But if I have more to say, I’ll be sure to post it in the vein of this. ;)

A self-explanatory conversation

I suppose I should be embarrassed that I actually took up this position in a conversation.

27.05.11 06:50 I’m starting to think that young kids on the Internet are all idiots.
27.05.11 06:58 I have suspected for a long time that everyone on the Internet is an idiot.
27.05.11 06:58 The Internet is like cars and TVs.
27.05.11 06:59 Only idiots on it?
27.05.11 06:59 They have to be reduced to the most inane terms to make them usable by everyone — especially the absolute moron — so that companies can make money.
27.05.11 06:59 So cars are just boxes with wheels, that we turn and go places.
27.05.11 06:59 TVs are just boxes with buttons that show pictures.
27.05.11 06:59 Internet is similar.
27.05.11 07:00 The less complicated, the more people use it, the better a chance to make money.
27.05.11 07:00 And at the same time, the collective census of people using it has an average intelligence level that is slowly floating downward.
27.05.11 07:01 Software is doing the same thing.
27.05.11 07:01 You really should write a book.
27.05.11 07:03 Or start a blog.

There’s really no way to defend that without coming across like an elitist prig. Social grace demands that I withhold some ugly concepts in order to be polite.

I could tell you that all of humanity rolls across a bell curve for computer aptitude, and people near the left-hand tail should probably stick with pens and paper.

But that would imply that some people simply don’t have a practical ability level, and that would sound mean-spirited, and therefore taboo.

I could insist that pushing Linux to embrace more of the central arc of that bell curve means that another resulting curve — the average ability level of Linux users — likewise shifts downward.

But that would imply that pulling in day-to-day users results in less impressive statistics, or that the regular user is getting stupider.

That would likewise be ugly and therefore can’t be repeated.

So I will mention none of those things, and refrain from suggesting that crafting Linux to appeal to less adept computer users is resulting in a mass stupidification of the user base.

I admit I had suggested some similar points, but it was an extract from a conversation on many different topics at once. And I feel slightly guilty now, just as a sign of penitence.

After that, if you inferred anything else, you’re on your own. :evil:

Still with ConnochaetOS

In case you were wondering, or even if you weren’t, I should mention that the 150Mhz Mebius is still the brains behind this operation.

And although I sometimes flip-flop between distros for it, the chief contender at this juncture is still ConnochaetOS.

During my Extremely Busy Time a week or so ago, I briefly returned to the Crux installation I had in place as recently as March.

But that unfortunately relies on Xorg to do most of the dirty work, and on a machine this slow, I have no faith in X and company.

ConnochaetOS inherits a lot of Arch Linux’s demeanor, and using only the framebuffer (which it can automatically configure to 800×600 on this confounded Trident video card, even when I can’t do it myself :evil: ) makes this machine a very impressive performer.

By default ConnochaetOS installs a graphical environment, and that means you’ll have to strip out a lot of the stuff that comes in the 0.8.9 beta 2 ISO.

It’s worth the effort though, because the resulting system, spared of the trappings and dead weight of Xorg, takes up much less space on the hard drive and much less space in memory.

It’s not perfect of course. Sound is sometimes sketchy, but it’s sketchy in my custom systems too. Sometimes the bell rings when someone sends a message in centerim, and sometimes it doesn’t. :roll:

But it admits a little more flexibility, hardware-wise, than the custom systems I have built. And there’s the benefit of being lazy, and letting someone else handle the hard work of updating core software. ;)

That’s nice, even I have to build and maintain the other 90 percent of the software I use, because it’s not in the conventional repos.

Luckily Arch, and by extension ConnochaetOS, has some remarkable tools just for that. Hello, PKGBUILDs.

All things considered, I like using this a lot more than some of the other systems I’ve tried at this speed. Debian won’t boot, Crux is more high-maintenance than I want right now … this one is just right.

If you’re also trapped in the i586 bracket, I wholeheartedly recommend it. Even as I did six months ago. … :)

Less than successful: mc as a daemon

Sometimes I try things that sound good while they’re bouncing around in my brain, but after they’re done, I wonder why I bothered.

A long time ago, someone posted a method for trapping rtorrent in screen session and running it as a daemon. Attaching to the screen session gave normal users a way of controlling it.

Detaching from screen meant it continued to run in the background, so long as it wasn’t told outright to quit. And since it started as a system service, just turning on the machine put it into action.

At the same time, I banged around with mc about nine months ago, trying to force it into tty1 instead of getty.

The goal there was similar — to start up an application with the system, devote a single virtual console to it, and allow the user to bounce back and forth to that tty as a means of running it.

Last week during my forced hiatus, I tried a hybrid of those two, and more or less managed to run mc as a daemon, also within screen and with it triggered at bootup.

It wasn’t quite successful though (you probably guessed that, didn’t you?). In the time that has elapsed since the original post about rtorrent-plus-screen, things seem to have changed in the way those things work.

To summarize, I couldn’t get the ownership issues sorted out. The autostarting instance of screen was for some reason invisible to a normal user, which of course defeated the purpose.

Trying to shift the burden to tty1 only confused things. screen balked, and my configurations were somehow inaccessible.

Without a .screenrc that I could cue, tty1 opened up as a vanilla screen session, and then refused to budge beyond the welcome message.

Of course, after all was said and done, I began to wonder why I was bothering with the idea at all. Midnight Commander is a tiny little program that runs fine on every machine in the house.

And I couldn’t even use the excuse that it was somehow easier to invoke that way, since you can start mc with three keystrokes. :roll:

Short of assigning a custom keypress to the mc command, it doesn’t get much simpler than m-c-Enter.

Still, science demanded an answer. Unfortunately, this time my answer was gibberish. :|

Quick note: goosh.org

Time is short today, but I feel like I should leave an equally short note by mentioning goosh.org.

 

It’s hard for me to frame exactly what goosh.org is, except maybe to point out that “goosh” breaks apart into “Google shell.”

So if you can imagine a text-based interface to Google … well, you might have the right idea.

No, this is not really a substitute for surfraw, so much as an oddball way to communicate with Google.

I’ll let you explore the site and see how much of it appeals to you. It has a few noteworthy fillips, scattered here and there.

I should point out a small measure of irony though, in that goosh.org doesn’t work for me in a text-based browser. elinks just refers itself back to the original page again.

But that’s okay. It’s still worth taking a look at. You can show it to your friends, or trap it in a borderless panel in your tiling window manager, and win points from your geek friends. Enjoy. :)