You secretly love the command line, don’t you?

It’s as plain as day. I profess no special powers or magical ability to read thoughts. I am not a circus performer or a side-alley psychic. It’s just blatantly obvious.


Gnome-Do

Kupfer

gmrun

Gnome’s Alt+F2

The funny part is, if I get up close to the screen and squint really, really hard, those all look remarkably like. …


Yep, I’m sure of it. You secretly love the command line, don’t you? :twisted:

P.S.: Tell your mother you love her. Buy her the Humble Indie Bundle.

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18 thoughts on “You secretly love the command line, don’t you?

  1. Greg

    Do not be ridiculous sir. I am not a computer genius nor do I have time to learn such an archaic method of computing. I just want to be able to type a program name and have it come up.
    :P

    Reply
  2. ulrik

    Yeah, it’s similar.

    By the way: this blog post illustrates what the new gnome icon theme (2.30) has done to launchers. Look at Do and Kupfer: the execute icon is low-res. The new icon theme is nice in its corners and all, but at the same time many icons are suddenly only available at lower res.

    Reply
    1. TheGZeus

      Actually, H Dee, the command line is the interaction method, and with normal PC hardware you have VTTY(Virtual Teletype) and under X there are various Terminal Emulators.
      Most of them emulate at least the VT100 to some degree.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminal_emulator
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_terminal#Dumb_terminal

      I’m not trying to be a heel, I’ve been corrected in this way, as well. It’s good to know you’re 100% right, not just think it to be so.

      Reply
  3. fuxter

    wow! your blog is the last place i would expect to see Humble Bumble Whatever on!
    i bow to you, sir!

    Reply
  4. tonybaldwin

    I use grun, myself.
    I press Alt+p to bring up grun (this is the keybinding to run stuff that I got used to in in wmii, dwm, and other wms.)
    Of course, most of my apps I can bring up with a keybinding without using grun.
    That’s one of the things I dig about ob. So easy to add keybindings in the rc.xml file.
    Ctrl+b brings up my browser (google-chrome).
    Ctrl+e brings up my favorite editor (tcltext).
    Ctrl+0 = oowriter.
    Ctrl+r = roxterm (preferred terminal), and Ctrl+t = xterm.
    etc., ad infinitum.

    That said, I DO love the command line, and always have a terminal or two open. It’s just so easy to pop Alt+p and type a name, or whatever keybinding I have programmed in for specific apps.

    Reply
  5. ing

    Ok I confess it. The funny thing is; the number one application that I launch with kupfer is gnome terminal.

    Reply
  6. Nobody Important

    I bought the Humble Bundle a couple of days ago, and I’ve been throwing notice of it everywhere I go. I have yet to download the games, but I will eventually.

    I love the command line. I’d use it more if I had a working Linux install. Consider this sentence a placeholder for swear-filled complaining about Vista’s awful trappings!

    Reply
  7. sertse

    Ahh but you see, a run app closes itself after launching the app, a terminal doesn’t.

    That makes all the difference :P

    Reply
  8. ulrik

    I thought kupfer loved the command line. You can use ‘kupfer FILE’ from the command line to put a file in kupfer’s window. And it recently gained the ability to run programs and catch it’s output, so that you can do further actions on that (copy, make note, etc).

    Reply
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  10. foo

    Is it only me or is Gnome featuring more than usual in your blog recently?

    That X60s is definitely corrupting you. Bring back the old K.mandla! >:|

    Reply
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  12. Cian

    XMonad has the scratchpad, which is pretty sweet. Press a hotkey to bring up a full terminal, press it again to make it disappear. With that and dmenu I pretty much have it covered.

    Reply
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